Legacy Family Tree Webinars 2021 and subscription benefits

I’m excited to share the announcement that the 2021 webinar series topics and speakers for Family Tree Webinars is now live. All 120 live webinars in 2021 are initially free and for one week, but you need to sign up. After that, viewing or reviewing them needs a membership. I can’t yet tell you my part in the 2021 Legacy Family Tree Webinars, but that announcement will be coming soon.

Why subscribe??

·  Anytime access to the 120+ webinars that will be added during 2021 once they have debuted.

Anytime access to the 1,400+ classes already in the Legacy library.

·  Anytime access to existing and then future members-only webinars (already hundreds of these),

·  TechZone presentations available for the duration of your membership.

·  Anytime access to the 5,400+ pages of instructors’ handouts and the new handouts of 2021 once they debut.

·  Access to the Chat logs from the live webinars

·  5% savings on other things from the Legacy Family Tree online store.

·  Chance to win a subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar.

·  Access to the Playlist, resume watching any time after you are interrupted, and jump-to features.

·  View upcoming webinars on the website at http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1736

5% savings on other things from the Legacy Family Tree online store. And chances to win a subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar. And access to the Playlist, resume watching any time after you are interrupted, and jump-to features.

View upcoming webinars on the website at http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1736


Subscribe using my affiliate link and you provide a bit of help to my educational blogging efforts. A members is only $49.95 a year. What an educational bargain. http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1742


Be ready for holiday memories with genealogy prompts

Christmas, Kwanzza, and New Year’s celebrations are being scaled back due to the coronavirus. Many of us are meeting safely via Zoom, Google Meet, Skype, and some other platforms. My family is doing so the first weekend of the New Year.

Some of our virtual get-togethers will involve food, gifts, maybe something silly, and of course, lots of chatting. Hopefully, someone will mention Grandma Sally’s famous Christmas cookies or the year Great Granduncle George stayed awake through dinner. A clever family historian will have questions and comments ready to entice some ancestral family discussions without saying the word “genealogy.”

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10 years of GRIP: 2021 will be virtual

Ten years ago, four course coordinators sat at a table with the directors and discussed the very first Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP). We were having dinner with Deb Deal and Elissa Scalise Powell who were the architects of GRIP. The first four coordinators were the late John T. Humphrey and Thomas W. Jones, Paula Stuart-Warren, and D. Joshua Taylor. It was a true discussion as the directors asked questions, we listened, we answered, we asked questions and made suggestions, and the directors then discussed those with us. They listened and acted on things we suggested. It was wonderful.

Ten years later, GRIP is still growing strong. 2020 and the year of the Pandemic saw GRIP being held virtually. That caring for the health and safety of all of us did not slow it down. In fact, GRIP rocked from all reports! 2021 is the Tenth Anniversary of GRIP and it will again be virtual. You do not want to miss being a part of the celebration and great education.

Check out the GRIP website, review the courses, make some choices for both weeks, and be ready for the online registration in February. https://www.gripitt.org

May I suggest checking out the June 20-25th week course that Icoordinate and teach in : Digging Deeper: Records, Tools, and Skills.

I will also be teaching 3 classes that week in Cari Taplin’s course: The Spirit of the Inland Seas: Research in the Great Lakes Region

It’s important to fully read the Registration page so that you are ready on February 17th!

Genealogy sales & special deals

Since my blog is designed to be more educational in nature and to also discuss my own family and presentations, I have decided to change how I promote other businesses and offers. I still want to share these with you but will not be doing single posts on each. I will periodically post a list of special offers, pricing, and related information so that you won’t be missing any press releases I receive or other notices I have seen. Between now and the upcoming holidays into January, keep your eyes open here and elsewhere for special offers!

Dear Myrtle and Research Write Connect Academy

Dear Mytle’s Wacky Wednesday is featuring genealogical education. I was privileged to be part of the November 13th edition with Liza Alzo who created Research Write Connect Academy. I give a lot of credit to Pat Richley-Erickson and Cousin Russ (Worthington) who guided us along and made the hour full of great info on Lisa’s work, the courses, a special offer, and more! View it on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTKU_-BBATU&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR1ZiYXAiFfrMAKNPrHXxibdNgRwzL5XLTjY8FWAg9oGeEYsVJCjCmaUOM8

Did you know this professional genealogist attended law school? Always check her sources.

Education has always been important to me and has continued throughout my personal family history research and in my job as a professional genealogist.

 I love to tell people that I went to the same building for high school as my grandmother attended in grade school. That usually brings a quizzical look from anyone who hears me utter that strange sentence. That’s what I though was true. My maternal grandmother (born in 1901) attended St. Luke’s grade school here in Saint Paul, Minnesota because it was just down the block at 880 Portland Avenue from where the family lived at 1011 Portland. The St. Luke’s school building was later purchased and became Our Lady of Peace (OLP) High School. That’s where I went to high school.  Research to back up my statement later showed that the same building where I walked the halls was the second building on the same land as had been the grade school. The original building was built in 1904. That building was replaced with the larger brick building in about 1931. That’s from old research that shows my notes were not well-cited. (Do cite as I teach, do not do as I did.)

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