Sum, sum, summertime: join me in genealogy education 3 times!

Genealogy education and research doesn’t stop in the summer. Air conditioning makes it more desirable. Among the variety offered this coming summer are these three events at which I will be teaching.

  • July 16-21, Pittsburgh, Annual Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh. Registration has begun for this annual summer week of genealogical education. It is held at LaRoche College, in the northern suburbs of Pittsburgh. For available seats check the website. The course I coordinate is Intermediate Genealogy: Tools for Digging Deeper. Some seats are still available for it. Read my earlier post for more information on this course and on GRIP.

 

  • July 28-30, Minneapolis, International German Genealogy Partnership (IGGP) Inaugural Conference. I will be doing three presentations. Other presenters from all over the U.S. and other countries. Registration and full details  www.iggpartner.org/

 

  • August 30-September 2, Pittsburgh, Federation of Genealogical Societies Annual Conference. 4 days of learning, exhibit hall, discussion, meals, and more. The full program booklet is now online and I see that I will be busy learning as well as doing one presentation and a two-hour workshop on research planning. Registration will begin soon. For more details and a link to the program check the FGS Voice blog.

 

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San Francisco earthquake deaths historian passes away

This popped up on my news feed a few days ago. I remember reading about Gladys’ quest to document all the San Francisco 1906 earthquake deaths. Many historical and genealogical publications carried news of her search and request for information from others.

I hadn’t heard her name in several years and what make this news a bit strange is that I was recently thinking about her quest. Last year I wrote about possessing a pre-earthquake marriage record.

The news release stated “Gladys Hansen, San Francisco’s longtime city archivist, and a renowned expert on the city’s history, died last Sunday of the infirmities of old age. She was 91.

Mrs. Hansen was best known for her research on what she called the hidden history of the 1906 earthquake and fire. She believed the death toll from the disaster was much higher than the city admitted at the time. Her research showed that between 3,000 and 4,000 men and women died in the quake and the fires that followed, a number much higher than the official list of 478 people who lost their lives.”

I still need to read the book on the subject that she co-authored, Denial of Disaster.

The full article on her death and history is here on SF Gate.

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It’s the Irish in me that celebrates St. Patrick’s Day honestly

In the U.S. we make more of celebrating St  Patrick’s Day than do our cousins in Ireland. I am one of those who can claim my Irish ancestry quite honestly.

Six of my great great grandparents (and their parents) were born in Ireland giving me these surnames: Hanley, Walsh, Bowler, Fitzgerald, Keliher, Green, Cook, and Moriarty plus others I have not yet discovered. A great great great great grandmother is supposedly Irish and that surname is Saggers.

Two of those great great grandparents came to Minnesota, a Cook and a Moriarty. Catherine Moriarity’s mother Ellen (Green) Moriarty also joined them in Rice County.

Three of my great grandparents who were born in Ireland came to the U.S.  That brings the surnames Cook, Hanley, and Walsh (Welch) to Minnesota. Hanley and Walsh came to Winona County.

The Winona and Rice counties ancestors came north to live in Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota. Their descendants met and fell in love at at dance at the Saint Paul Hotel in downtown. This was during the Roaring Twenties! I am so glad my grandparents met!

Clarification: These are all on my mother’s side of the family. Nary a Irish gene on my father’s side.

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Presentations update: Paula is definitely available for your event

I was asked if I had stopped doing presentations for genealogy and history organizations. Not at all. I simply took off most of the first half of 2017. I turned down invitations, didn’t promote my lectures as much, and took the time off to do some catching up.

2016 was an amazingly busy year. I was involved in some heavy-duty research on court cases, did many presentations around the U.S., had a huge mess in my apartment after a sewage backup and lots of repairs, and most of all, our entire family was in the midst of taking care of an ill family member. He is improving, the kitchen is almost redone (for a second time), and now I am catching up on client work and reporting. I had to cut back on volunteer work and I had a good excuse for not dusting my apartment! Sorting and recycling many years of work paper accumulation is already being done.

As you can see by my speaking calendar on this website, I have a few presentations yet this spring but come July – November, I may be in your location.

Thus, if you need a speaker for your genealogical, historical, social, civic, or other event, check out my speaking calendar and lecture topics on this website, and contact me for complete details. The email is on those pages. I am already under contract for two events in 2018 and a third one is nearing contract status. Don’t miss out on the date your organization needs!

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Ancestry Academy: A gift for subscribers and members from Ancestry

Did you know that Ancestry is giving us all a gift of free, quality education? If you can log into Ancestry, as a subscriber at any level, or even with a DNA test or free family tree, you can see Academy presentations for free. You don’t have to be a subscriber, but you do have to be a registered “member.”

Not a subscriber? Not done a DNA test yet? But added a free tree? Simply sign in to Ancestry Academy with your own sign-in information. If you don’t have this, it’s simple to do right on the Ancestry Academy main page by clicking on “Sign Up Today.”

The variety of presenters and topics is amazing. Even the presenters view the videos of other presenters. No one knows everything! Many of the videos are accompanied by extensive handouts.

The two presentation of mine that area already online are:

  • Native American Ancestry? Steps to Learn More
  • The Lure of the Train Whistle: Researching Railroad Workers

Start learning here!

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Old Minnesota newspapers in your research plan?

A large array of Minnesota newspapers is on a new platform that will soon require you to change what you have bookmarked for your search. “The Minnesota Digital Newspaper Hub has moved to a new platform – the same platform used by Swedish American Newspapers and Historical Minneapolis Tribune.” It’s just one part of the great Minnesota Historical Society website.

With this change, researchers get the historic Minneapolis Tribune titles, foreign-language titles, and other new content with a promise of more to come.  with more new titles and date ranges on the way.

As the MHS website further states, “The Minnesota Digital Newspaper Hub is a searchable website from the Minnesota Historical Society that makes hundreds of thousands of pages of Minnesota newspapers available online. The Hub contains geographically and culturally diverse newspapers published between 1856 and today. Due to copyright law, most newspapers published after 1922 can only be accessed from the Gale Family Library at the Minnesota History Center. Explore the Newspaper Hub.”

MHS has cabinet after cabinet of microfilmed newspapers from all around Minnesota. Several rows of microfilm readers, several printers, and a machine for digitizing the articles you find. Copies are only .35 each. MHS has a large parking lot (fee required), a cafe, great exhibits, and microfilms, books and original records galore. Learn more at www.mnhs.org

 

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Special Education History: From a Ph.D. who is a genealogist!

Today there are many people worried about the future of special education for our children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and cousins who have special needs. I know several people who have been involved in Special Education and not surprisingly, most are also genealogists.

I am delighted to announce that a former student of mine, Norena A. Hale, is documenting the history of this needed education and especially in Minnesota. She will be producing more on this topic, too.

I blushed a bit when she told me, “I have you to thank for starting me on this journey from the early classes I took with you, esp. at the MN History Center. I’ve become a regular using their library as I search the early history of how we did or did not educate children with disabilities in MN.”

Let me tell you about part of her journey in her own words. When you read the “About the author” note that she is not shy about her genealogy connections! Her book is titled Special Education Administration: How it Evolved in Minnesota. (Self-published through CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform,  2016. Available on Amazon.) I am saddened at how long it took to get such programs going. 

“Through the Minnesota Special Education Leaders Foundation, Norena Hale pieces together how (more…)

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March 8, Wednesday is GRIP July registration. What’s GRIP?

Each summer, attendees from all over the United States and several countries come to the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) for in-depth, hands-on week-long courses. Registration will open on Wednesday, March 8 at noon Eastern (9 a.m. Pacific) for the six courses being offered July 16-21, 2017 on the beautiful campus of La Roche College in the northern suburbs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. See detailed course descriptions of the 18 sessions in each course at www.GRIPitt.org/courses <http://www.GRIPitt.org/courses> including DNA, Advanced DNA, Irish, Law School, Intermediate, and Research in New Jersey.

The coordinators for the July course put together the class details on the GRIP website and also wrote a blog post for their course. Those posts can be found on the sidebar under the “In Their Words” titles.

If you have any questions about the intermediate course, just post them as a comment to this post.

I hope to see you in July!

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Local class: The Three Rs: Reading, ‘Riting, and Research in School Records

On Saturday, May 13, 2017 I will be teaching an extended class on school records. The place is the Minnesota Historical Society.

 

School records are extensive including teaching contracts, school censuses, grading, attendance, conduct, parent and guardian names, minutes, sports participation and many more specific records that provide individual and family details. Schools include elementary, high school, college, specialty schools and even reform schools. This class is also helpful for those who are editors of alumni newsletters or on committees to plan single class or all-school reunions. In the session we will also cover where to find the records today, how to access them, and learn about digitization efforts.

 

The Three Rs: Reading, ‘Riting, and Research in School Records
Sat., May 13, 2017, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Location

Minnesota History Center, 345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102

Contact

651-259-3300
reference@mnhs.org

Cost
$32/$28 MNHS and MGS members

 

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Cyndi’s List of website links is now an adult! 21 years of links!

This appeared on Facebook this afternoon in a post by Cyndi Ingle. When does this woman sleep?

“Today Cyndi’s List is 21 years old. To celebrate I’ve been busy on the site, yesterday alone I updated 937 links and added 78 new. Over the past couple of weeks I’ve updated almost 1,800 and added about 850. How much will I accomplish today? Yes, folks, it is just a one-woman show. I appreciate all the help and support you can give me, including: submitting new links, reporting broken links, and making donations to offset the expense of running the site. Thank you to all of you for helping to keep Cyndi’s List current and useful and FREE!
http://www.cyndislist.com/donate/

If you are in the Midwest, you have a chance to hear her in person at the tenth annual Minnesota Genealogical Society North Star Conference this coming October 6 & 7 at the Earle Brown Heritage Center, Brooklyn Center. Watch the MGS website for forthcoming details.

 

 

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