DAR state guides on Revolutionary War research

Under the guidance and in-depth research work of Eric G. Grundset, Director of Library Publications, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is publishing a series of guides related to Revolutionary War research in various states.  The DAR website states this “provides detailed information on the availability of manuscript and archival material that exists for the state for the period of the Revolutionary War along with listings of historical and genealogical studies that have been published and which supplement the original sources. It is the most extensive gathering of such information ever published, and researchers will find it an essential resource with which to identify materials and studies located in many scattered libraries and archives.” These books are several hundred pages long, have maps, and are indexed. Each is available in print or a PDF edition.

The already published volumes are on New York, South Carolina, Georgia, Rhode Island, Virginia (includes West Virginia, Kentucky and the Old Northwest), Massachusetts/Maine, and North Carolina. The volume for Connecticut, the eighth book in the series, will be available any day. If you are interested in this or others please check the DAR Store’s webpage at: dar.org/national-society/about-dar/dar-publications.

The Georgia printed volume is presently out of print and will likely be reprinted in a couple of months. Next up is the book for Pennsylvania, the ninth in the series. This will be followed in the next year or so by the remaining states: New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, and New Hampshire/Vermont.

 

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Better pictures with your cell phone? Use Fopydo!

This morning I gave a talk in Wisconsin and a question was asked that led me to talking about the Fopydo. You read that correctly, I didn’t make up the word or misspell it. According to the company’s website, it is an abbreviation of “photo-copy documents.”

It’s a simple tool that comes folded flat, but when assembled provides an excellent and cheap way to steady your camera when taking pictures of documents, pages from a book, or of a family photo. It really helps if you have any issues holding your cell phone perfectly still to take such pictures.

This is a link to more info on the FopyDo http://fopydo.com/. I learned about these from Cyndi Ingle of Cyndi’s List. I ordered mine from Amazon.

 

 

 

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FamilySearch Wiki: Have you rechecked pages of interest?

When is the last time you checked the FamilySearch’s Family History Research Wiki for your ancestral cities, counties, states, provinces, and countries? Many are continually being updated. How about the pages about genealogy topics such as census, tax lists and others?

One page that has been updated and has added content is Hanover Military Records. It’s a really good page and makes me wish I had Hanover ancestry.

Not all pages are as comprehensive as this one, but using this in conjunction with Cyndi’s List for ancestral locations really broadens your knowledge and ability to find history and records for your family.

 

 

 

 

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Feb 1 Registration for Inaugural International Germanic Genealogy Conference

I hope you already have July 28-30, 2017 marked on your calendar for the inaugural conference of the International German Genealogy Partnership (IGGP). It will be held in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota (Minneapolis area).

The first-ever International Germanic Genealogy Conference has already created quite a buzz. The host hotel where the class sessions will be held is already sold out! Never fear, the intrepid organizers have already made arrangements at nearby hotels. The full program, special event details, and information on the additional hotels is all on the IGGP website.

It is truly an international partnership and international conference. The partners are German genealogy societies from all over the world, including this year’s host organization, The Germanic Genealogy Society, of which I am a long-time member. I am fortunate to be one of the many speakers. Skimming through the program tells me I am going to have to make some tough decisions about which sessions to attend each hour.

Tomorrow, February 1, 2017 is when registration opens. Don’t delay! Click on the IGGP link above to register.

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2017 Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh

Genealogical institutes are great places for week-long in-depth learning. The Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) is one place for that. Students sign up for one course that takes place from Monday through Friday. GRIP offers two different weeks in the summer and each offers classes on many topics and geographic areas.  Air conditioned classrooms, cafeteria, and dorm rooms that are just steps from each other. Once you attend GRIP, you will return! The learning, the camaraderie, eating meals together, and being around others for a whole week of talking genealogy is rewarding.

The courses for the 2017 edition of GRIP may be found here.

I am the coordinator and one of the instructors for Intermediate Genealogy: Tools for Digging Deeper. Joining me as instructors are Debbie Mieszala, CG, Melissa A. Johnson, CG, and Karen Mauer Jones, CG, FGBS. This course takes place during the second week of GRIP, July 16-21.  This course offers an array of sessions, a group homework project that teaches several important research values, and the opportunity to have your  personal research issue discussed in class. That discussion leads to many suggestions for solving the problem.

The 2017 registration dates are:
Wednesday, February 22, 2017, for courses held June 25-30, 2017
Wednesday, March 8, 2017, for courses held July 16-21, 2017

The listing of the six courses in each week (total of twelve) can be seen here and by clicking on the course name you will see details of all eighteen sessions in each course (also available by hovering over the “Courses” tab). GRIP offers courses for genealogists of all levels of experience and knowledge.

Put those registration dates on your calendar right now!

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Three New Railroad Books

Budget and space dictate my book buying binges. It’s so tough to walk away from genealogy and history books. I see titles about the WPA, railroads, women’s history, and others but I am tormented. My winter 2016-17Minnesota History magazine arrived and it tells of three new railroad books:

  • The Great Northern Railway Through Time (Dale Peterka, Arcadia Publishing, 2016)
  • John H. Burdakin: Railroader (Don Hofsommer, Michigan State University Press, 2016) [I would love a whole library of books and articles by Hofsommer!]
  • Twelve Twenty-Five: The Life and Times of a Steam Locomotive (Kevin P. Keefe, Michigan State University Press, 2016)

Maybe I will go buy a lottery ticket so I can win and buy more books? I wonder what my children will say?

 

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2017 is a busy genealogy speaking year for me!

2017 is shaping up to be a busy year for classes, webinars, and seminars for me. I will be in many states and online! Join me at the events listed on my just updated speaking calendar. As I have said before, it’s fun to meet my blog readers. All my presentations have handouts that accompany the PowerPoint presentations.

If you ever see an error on one of those handouts, please do let me know!

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2016 is over. Done. Kaput. It wasn’t good for our family but 2017 is looking up.

It’s been a year filled with too many low lights, but there are good things, too. I won’t detail all that has happened but here are a few of them.

It’s the end of 2016 and I have great hope for a fantastic 2017. Please. 2016 was a big downer for me. Not the result of the election (though, ouch), not the loss of so many wonderful actors and musicians, but the family and friends issues of 2016. I feel like much of the year was spent in doctor’s offices and hospitals taking care of or watching over others. (more…)

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International German Genealogy Partnership is new name for a global organization

A new name to more accurately reflect what this organization is doing now and in the future! The press release on the new name:

International German Genealogy Partnership is new name of young organization, reflects growing global participation

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.—International German Genealogy Partnership is the new name adopted by members of a new and rapidly growing global organization known since its founding less than two years ago as the German-American Genealogical Partnership.

“New member societies are coming into the Partnership from around the world. There is a growing international participation in the Partnership, and our members decided on a new name that better describes the organization’s international presence,” said Kent Cutkomp, a Minneapolis resident and co-founder of the partnership.
The Partnership was founded in 2015 by genealogy society leaders in America and Germany. Today, the Partnership joins Germanic societies across America, Germany, Canada, England and other European countries.

“The purpose of the Partnership is to expand cooperation among societies nationally and internationally. It’s a great way individual societies can become more successful in serving their members, and that includes helping their members make personal connections worldwide. We’re delighted to see such interest coming from so many parts of the world,” Cutkomp said.

He said organizations joining the Partnership range from small to large. For instance, the Germany-based Deutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft Genealogischer Verbände, a founding member of the Partnership, comprises more than 65 societies serving 22,000 individual members.

Several major initiatives are being undertaken by the Partnership, including the 2017 International Germanic Genealogy Conference, scheduled for July 28-30, Minneapolis, Minn., and themed “CONNECTIONS: International. Cultural. Personal.”

Other initiatives include sharing of knowledge and resources such as exchanging periodicals, sharing researcher and speaker lists, and creating a list of most valuable references, resources and websites. Communication and connections between Partnership organizations are important parts of the process.

For information about the Partnership, visit the website of the Minnesota-based Germanic Genealogy Society at www.GGSMN.org, click “German Partnership.” The Partnership’s official website is expected to launch soon.

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